Coming up with the perfect guest list for your wedding takes time. It can get messy, especially if outsiders are involved in the planning or contributing financially. Not to say you shouldn't get your families together to discuss who makes the cut because that's the best way to ensure no one gets blindsided by a snub. But once you've figured out who gets a say on who gets a seat at a beautifully adorned table, then you can breathe a sigh of relief. Because once the drafts are completed and the final list is so good it could be laminated, there should be no more problems, right?

Wrong.

Because after the invites have been sent out, the RSVPs will soon come rolling in. And you might be shocked that some of the people who were special enough to warrant an invitation have actually returned their response cards with NO circled. Um, exsqueeze me?

Here's the thing, though. Try not to be offended. I know, I know, easier said than done. But while weddings can be expensive for the couple set to walk down the aisle, it can also be costly to attend one.

A recent survey conducted by Priceline found that wedding guests are spending $600 or more on a wedding. Crazy? Not really, once you factor in the engagement party, engagement gift, wedding shower, bachelorette or bachelor bashes, travel expenses, hotel room, and wedding present. Ka-ching!

Of the 1,016 adults aged 21 and over that were surveyed, 24 per cent spend between $800 and $1,000 on a bachelor or bachelorette party, which usually involves a trip of some kind. And speaking of travel, you can't forget about destination weddings. Sure, it's an excuse to take a trip with friends and loved ones but taking the time off work for someone else's big day doesn't always fly with everyone. But that's a whole other money-sucker.

The survey also found that most people attend an average of three weddings a year, which can cost about $900 per wedding. So it's no wonder the NO piles are getting bigger. Many are opting to skip the entire affair when it becomes too expensive.

But don't feel slighted, brides and grooms. It's normal to get some NOs so try not take it personally. It doesn't mean these people don't want to celebrate you or your marriage, especially if you made the right choice when narrowing down the guest list. Sometimes, money talks, but running out of money speaks louder.

Plus, look at the bright side. It just means you'll be paying for fewer dinners than you had planned for. Really, it's a win-win for all.

Image via Unsplash

denette_bio11.jpgDenette Wilford is a writer dabbling in the worlds of lifestyle, sports and entertainment. Her work has appeared in Huffington Post Canada, The Loop, The TV Junkies, 24 Hours Toronto and TV Guide Canada. Follow her on Twitter @DenetteWilford